Tuesday, June 21, 2011

New Group Blog

My wonderful critique group and I started a group blog at www.infinitecharacters.com. I'd love it if you could check it out. Mildred did a great interview with talented writer, K. Dawn Byrd.
K. Dawn will be giving away one gift card for a free download of Mistaken Identity to someone who leaves a comment at the close of this interview before midnight, Wednesday, June 22, 2011. Please check back on Thursday, June 23, 2011 for the winning post. The winner must email me within 5 days at mildred@infinitecharacters.com and leave your email address to receive the gift card.

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Building your Book Blurb

A group of writers for Writer's Alley came up with a fantastic list of ways to build a book blurb.

While taking in the fabulously seductive smell of books in B&N, I agree, I love to look at the backs of books and see what's I'm in store for me on a lazy Saturday afternoon while the kids play in the backyard and I mingle in the hammock. I need to be brushed away from my busy life, if only for a moment. So, the story is so important. And how do I know about the story? From the blurb on the back of the book. It needs to be fresh and unique. And wow, do I need to be hooked. And nailing the book blurb or “back cover” copy is so important.

"Regardless of whether you draft your logline and surrounding sentences before you begin writing your first word (I recommend drafting at least a rough version of this before you begin writing) of after you’ve typed The End, this step is crucial to get right."

It's like building a home. Here are the materials you'll need:

A strong foundation = a high concept logline
This is you're gotta-read-it hooked sentence. Decision to buy your book or not will hinge on how well you’ve crafted your concept.

Mortar & bricks = compelling characters
It's imperative on how you choose to describe your characters in your back cover copy. "Are we talking Plain Jane and Boring Bob or Intriguing Ida and Captivating Carl?"

Insulation = the current reality surrounding your character(s)

Plumbing = word choice

You don’t want a well written novel, only to have the back blurb be mediocre.

Windows = a glimpse of your voice and writing style
Here's where you give the reader a taste of your writing style.

Electrical = excitement factor or what James Scott Bell calls the “ka-ching” in The Art of War for Writers
Read it to others and see what they think.

Roofing = A hint the reader can trust in the satisfying experience

Let me know what you think.